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  • #16
    ukamikazu,

    I have a question for you. I tried H. corymbosa because it was cheap and I like the plant a great deal. When I received the plant, there were no roots at all. Today, I noticed that the roots have went crazy! Is this a good thing or is the plant trying to find substrate?

    Hard to tell from my picture, but all of those roots are from the H. corymbosa plant.



    Here is the above water portion (appears to look OK in my completely uninformed opinion)

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    • #17
      They're called "aerial" roots. They are a means of finding mechanical support for the plant though they are actual, typical roots. After a while they'll turn green then brown as they harden and daughter plants will start to pup out. Eventually, it will seek to root properly but this is not a fussy plant by any stretch. Good fertilization via frequent small feedings of your Apistos will keep it healthy and growing.

      You shouldn't worry. These are all good omens. Everything is going exactly right.

      One thing to keep in mind, as long as you have good light (check), abundant nutrients (double check) and there is plenty of CO2 (triple check) these plants will become weeds in no time. Daily dramatic growth is not at all unusual when growing plants emersed at first. They have an instinct to get out of the water as quickly as possible. There are very few plants that can be called obligate aquatics in reality.
      "You are much better off with no numbers than meaningless ones. The minute you believe numbers uncritically, that is, without understanding how they're calculated and how well they measure whatever they're supposed to measure, you will generate a breed of employee who will produce numbers and not results. Your data-processing system will then serve not to describe reality but to lie about it."

      -Micheal S. Montalbano

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      • #18
        Thank you again.

        I have not grown plants emersed before, the dramatic growth has really shocked me. It is fun to see the plants grow so fast. If I would have known that it is this fun and easy, I would have been growing these types of plants long ago!

        Time will tell about my nutrient system. I am using a 10-5-14 aquatic plant fertilizer dosed at the seller's recommendation once or twice a month. I have read conflicting reports about "all in one" type fertilizers. Since the plants I have are known as being undemanding (weeds lol!), maybe this simple approach will work for me.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by aarhud View Post

          ...maybe this simple approach will work for me.
          If only more people thought this way there would be more happy hobbyists.
          "You are much better off with no numbers than meaningless ones. The minute you believe numbers uncritically, that is, without understanding how they're calculated and how well they measure whatever they're supposed to measure, you will generate a breed of employee who will produce numbers and not results. Your data-processing system will then serve not to describe reality but to lie about it."

          -Micheal S. Montalbano

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          • #20
            I have another question. There are small black bugs on some of the plants. They seem to especially be interested in the frogbit and water lettuce. I knock the bugs into the water, but they get back on the plants. Is there a way to kill these bugs?

            Would removing the infected plants and dusting them with diatomaceous earth be a bad idea?

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            • #21
              I know what you're talking about. Unfortunately, growing plants emersed can also attract mealy bugs, aphids, thrips and gnats as as well. I've never tried diatomaceous earth outside of the garden so that does sound interesting. I remember reading somewhere that pond keepers sometimes make an 8:1 solution of water and diatomaceous earth with good results. I've also heard of spraying vegetable oil but that only works on soft bodied pests.

              When I have dealt with pests, I've used sticky tape, think flypaper, a solution of neem oil and if a nuclear option was required, a 10:1 solution of water and glutaraldehyde followed by a quick rinse. Strangely enough, the neem oil poses a far greater danger to the fish than the glutaraldehyde.

              There's also smashing them by hand and attempts to drown them.

              That's all I got .
              "You are much better off with no numbers than meaningless ones. The minute you believe numbers uncritically, that is, without understanding how they're calculated and how well they measure whatever they're supposed to measure, you will generate a breed of employee who will produce numbers and not results. Your data-processing system will then serve not to describe reality but to lie about it."

              -Micheal S. Montalbano

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